The Cyber Training Landscape in Europe: Insights from Peter Meyer, eyeo and member of CYBERWISER.eu Stakeholders Expert Board

 

Peter Meyer is a member of the CYBERWISER.eu Stakeholders Expert Board (SEB). SEB members are thought leaders in the cybersecurity sector that bring to CYBERWISER.eu their specific viewpoints and insights on cybersecurity training and education. This is where our Interview with Peter Meyer comes into play. Peter is Project Manager Security and Public Affairs at eyeo and CYBERWISER.eu SEB member. 

 

Peter leads the Security and Privacy team at the German tech company eyeo with over twenty-years experience. His focus is on fighting botnets, securing websites, detecting malware, or just sharing information about best practices on cyber security awareness.

 

In the interview. he talks us through the evolution of the cybersecurity training landscape in recent years, witnessing a shift in management mindsets about the allocation of budget in cybersecurity training in the wake of large-scale ransomware attacks. Another general shift is about the type of training activities 

“What I am also seeing is that cyber training activities have moved away from pure ex-cathedra teaching to a much more practical approach often including Anti-Phishing simulations, cyber ranges, or the use of gamification elements.”

 

Peter also highlights the importance of the private sector as a driver in the cybersecurity environment. Specifically he pointed out the key synergy that is taking place between large enterprises and startups/ SMEs:  

“startups have added plenty of innovation to the eLearning and cyber training landscape, especially by providing cyber training solutions for SMEs and by adapting them to regional markets. Many cyber training solutions built by an international corporation seem to be focused on being used by another international corporation, but such solutions often don’t meet the needs of a 100 employee SME in Germany or the Czech Republic.”

 

Anyway, the role of the public sector (EU agencies and Projects), in Peter’s opinion, is important too. Its role is to increase the general awareness about cybersecurity, in schools, universities and SMEs. In this vision governments and EU-agencies should offer some sorts of basic training that helps shape the general public increasing its cybersecurity culture. Germany is a good case in point, where the goal is

“to foster synergies in the industry and also to bring some structure into the wide landscape of solution providers, including the public sector and private initiatives. Their claim is: Networks protect Networks.”

Levers include free membership and “a lot of training seminars, networking events, workshops, and best practice papers, where members of the alliance share their knowledge and expertise with other members.”

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